Daily 1-km all-weather land surface temperature dataset for Western China (TRIMS LST-TP; 2000-2019) V2

The Qinghai Tibet Plateau is a sensitive region of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST), as the main parameter of land surface energy balance, characterizes the degree of energy and water exchange between land and atmosphere, and is widely used in the research of meteorology, climate, hydrology, ecology and other fields. In order to study the land atmosphere interaction over the Qinghai Tibet Plateau, it is urgent to develop an all-weather land surface temperature data set with long time series and high spatial-temporal resolution. However, due to the frequent cloud coverage in this region, the use of existing satellite thermal infrared remote sensing land surface temperature data sets is greatly limited. Compared with the daily 1 km spatial resolution all-weather land surface temperature data set (2003-2018) V1 in Western China released in 2019, this data set (V2) adopts a new generation method, namely satellite thermal infrared remote sensing reanalysis data integration method (RTM) based on the new land surface temperature time decomposition model. The main input data of the method are Aqua MODIS LST products and GLDAS data, and the auxiliary data include vegetation index and surface albedo provided by satellite remote sensing. This method makes full use of the high frequency and low frequency components of land surface temperature and the spatial correlation of land surface temperature provided by satellite thermal infrared remote sensing and reanalysis data. The evaluation results show that the land surface temperature data set has good image quality and accuracy, which is not only completely seamless in space, but also highly consistent with MODIS LST products widely used in the current academic circles in amplitude and spatial distribution. When MODIS LST was used as the reference value, the mean deviation (MBE) of the data set in daytime and nighttime was -0.28 K and -0.29 K respectively, and the standard deviation (STD) of the deviation was 1.25 K and 1.36 K respectively. The test results based on the measured data of six stations in the Qinghai Tibet Plateau and Heihe River Basin show that under clear sky conditions, the data set is highly consistent with the measured LST during the day / night, with R2 of 0.93 ~ 0.97 / 0.93 ~ 0.98; MBE of -0.42 ~ 0.25 K / - 0.35 ~ 0.19 K; RMSE of 1.03 ~ 2.28 K / 1.05 ~ 2.05 K; under non clear sky conditions, the MBE of the data set during the day / night is -0.55 ~ 1.42 K / - 0.46 ~ 1.27 K. The RMSE was 2.24-3.87 K / 2.03-3.62 K. Compared with the V1 version of the data, the two kinds of all-weather land surface temperature show the characteristics of seamless (i.e. no missing value) in the spatial dimension, and in most areas, the spatial distribution and amplitude of the two kinds of all-weather land surface temperature are highly consistent with MODIS land surface temperature. However, in the region where the brightness temperature of AMSR-E orbital gap is missing, the V1 version of land surface temperature has a significant systematic underestimation. The mass of trims land surface temperature is close to that of V1 version outside AMSR-E orbital gap, while the mass of trims is more reliable inside the orbital gap. Therefore, it is recommended that users use V2 version. The time span of this data set is from 2000 to 2019, and it will be updated continuously; the temporal resolution is twice daily (corresponding to the two transit times of aqua MODIS in the day and night respectively); the spatial resolution is 1 km. In order to facilitate the majority of colleagues to carry out targeted research around the Qinghai Tibet Plateau and its adjacent areas, and reduce the workload of data download and processing, the coverage of this dataset is limited to Western China and its surrounding areas (72 ° e-104 ° e, 20 ° n-45 ° n) with the Qinghai Tibet Plateau as the core. Therefore, this dataset is abbreviated as trims lst-tp (thermal and reality integrating medium resolution spatial seam LST – Tibetan Plateau) for user's convenience.

0 2021-04-14

Glacier coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau in 2013 (TPG2013, Version1.0)

The Tibetan Plateau Glacier Data –TPG2013 is a glacial coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau around 2013. 128 Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images were selected with 30-m spatial resolution, for comparability with previous and current glacier inventories. Besides, about 20 images acquired in 2014 were used to complete the full coverage of the TP. The most frequent year in this period was defined as the reference year for the mosaic image: i.e. 2013. Glacier outlines were digitized on-screen manually from the 2013 image mosaic, relying on false-colour image composites (RGB by bands 654), which allowed us to distinguish ice/snow from cloud. Debris-free ice was distinguished from the debris and debris-covered ice by its higher reflectance. Debris-covered ice was not delineated in this data. [To minimize the effects of snow or cloud cover on glacierized areas, high-resolution (30 m spatial resolution and 4-day repetition cycle) images were also used for reference in glacier delineation from the Chinese satellites HJ-1A and HJ-1B, which were launched on Sep.6th 2008. Both carried as payload two 4-band CCD cameras with swath width 700 km (360 km per camera). All HJ-1A/1B data in 2012, 2013 and 2014 (65 scenes, Fig.S1, Table S1) were from China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Application (CRESDA; http://www.cresda.com/n16/n92006/n92066/n98627/index.html). Each scene was orthorectified with respect to the 30m-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Landsat images.] The delineated glacier outlines were compared with band-ratio (e.g. TM3/TM5) results, and validated by overlapping them onto Google Earth imagery, SRTM DEM, topographic maps and corresponding satellite images. Topographic maps from the 1970s and all available satellite images (including Google EarthTM imagery and HJ-1A/1B satellite data) were used as base reference data. For areas with mountain shadows and snow cover, they were verified by different methods using data from different seasons. For glaciers in deep shadow, Google EarthTM imagery from different dates was used as the reference for manual delineation. Steep slopes or headwalls were also excluded in the TPG2013. Areas that appeared in any of these sources to have the characteristics of exposed ground/basement/bed rock were manually delineated as non-glacier, and were also cross-checked with CGI-1 and CGI-2. Steep hanging glaciers were included in TPG2013 if they were identifiable on images in all three epochs (i.e. TPG1976, TPG2001, and TPG2013). The accuracy of manual digitization was controlled within one half-pixel. All glacier areas were calculated on the WGS84 spheroid in an Albers equal-area map projection centred at (95°E, 30°N) with standard parallels at 15°N and 65°N. Our results showed that the relative deviation of manual interpretation was less than 3.9%.

0 2021-04-09

Glacier coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau in 1970s (TPG1976, Version 1.0)

The Tibetan Plateau Glacial Data -TPG1976 is a glacial coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau in the 1970s. It was generated by manual interpretation from Landsat MSS multispectral image data. The temporal coverage was mainly from 1972 to 1979 by 60 m spatial resolution. It involved 205 scenes of Landsat MSS/TM. There were 189 scenes(92% coverage on TP)in 1972-79,including 116 scenes in 1976/77 (61% of all the collected satellite data).As high quality of MSS data is not accessible due to cloud and snow effects in the South-east Tibetan Plateau, earlier Landsat TM data was collected for usage, including 14 scenes of 1980s(1981,1986-89,which covers 6.5% of TP) and 2 scenes in 1994(by 1.5% coverage on TP).Among all satellite data,77% was collected in winter with the minimum effects of cloud and seasonal snow. The most frequent year in this period was defined as the reference year for the mosaic image: i.e. 1976. Glacier outlines were digitized on-screen manually from the 1976 image mosaic, relying on false-colour image composites (MSS: red, green and blue (RGB) represented by bands 321; TM: RGB by bands 543), which allowed us to distinguish ice/snow from cloud. Debris-free ice was distinguished from the debris and debris-covered ice by its higher reflectance. Debris-covered ice was not delineated in this data. The delineated glacier outlines were compared with band-ratio results, and validated by overlapping them onto Google Earth imagery, SRTM DEM, topographic maps and corresponding satellite images. For areas with mountain shadows and snow cover, they were verified by different methods using data from different seasons. For glaciers in deep shadow, Google EarthTM imagery from different dates was used as the reference for manual delineation. Steep slopes or headwalls were also excluded in the TPG1976. Areas that appeared in any of these sources to have the characteristics of exposed ground/basement/bed rock were manually delineated as non-glacier, and were also cross-checked with CGI-1 and CGI-2. Steep hanging glaciers were included in TPG1976 if they were identifiable on images in all three epochs (i.e. TPG1976, TPG2001, and TPG2013). The accuracy of manual digitization was controlled within one half-pixel. All glacier areas were calculated on the WGS84 spheroid in an Albers equal-area map projection centred at (95°E, 30°N) with standard parallels at 15°N and 65°N. Our results showed that the relative deviation of manual interpretation was less than 6.4% due to the 60 m spatial resolution images.

0 2021-04-09

Glacier coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau in 2017 (TPG2017, Version1.0)

The Tibetan Plateau Glacier Data –TPG2017 is a glacial coverage data on the Tibetan Plateau from selected 210 scenes of Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images with 30-m spatial resolution from 2013 to 2018, among of which 90% was in 2017 and 85% in winter. Therefore, 2017 was defined as the reference year for the mosaic image. Glacier outlines were digitized on-screen manually from the 2017 image mosaic, relying on false-colour image composites (RGB by bands 654), which allowed us to distinguish ice/snow from cloud. Debris-free ice was distinguished from the debris and debris-covered ice by its higher reflectance. Debris-covered ice was not delineated in this data. The delineated glacier outlines were compared with band-ratio (e.g. TM3/TM5) results, and validated by overlapping them onto Google Earth imagery, SRTM DEM, topographic maps and corresponding satellite images. For areas with mountain shadows and snow cover, they were verified by different methods using data from different seasons. For glaciers in deep shadow, Google EarthTM imagery from different dates was used as the reference for manual delineation. Steep slopes or headwalls were also excluded in the TPG2017. Areas that appeared in any of these sources to have the characteristics of exposed ground/basement/bed rock were manually delineated as non-glacier, and were also cross-checked with CGI-1 and CGI-2. Steep hanging glaciers were included in TPG2017 if they were identifiable on images in all other three epochs (i.e. TPG1976, TPG2001, and TPG2013). The accuracy of manual digitization was controlled within one half-pixel. All glacier areas were calculated on the WGS84 spheroid in an Albers equal-area map projection centred at (95°E, 30°N) with standard parallels at 15°N and 65°N. Our results showed that the relative deviation of manual interpretation was less than 3.9%.

0 2021-04-09

The ASTER_GDEM dataset of the Tibetan Plateau (2011)

The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM) is a global digital elevation data product jointly released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of America (NASA) and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan (METI). The DEM data were based on the observation results of NASA’s new generation of Earth observation satellite, TERRA, and generated from 1.3 million stereo image pairs collected by ASTER (Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radio meter) sensors, covering more than 99% of the land surface of the Earth. These data were downloaded from the ASTER GDEM data distribution website. For the convenience of using the data, based on framing the ASTER GDEM data, we used Erdas software to splice and prepare the ASTER GDEM mosaic of the Tibetan Plateau. This data set contains three data files: ASTER_GDEM_TILES ASTERGDEM_MOSAIC_DEM ASTERGDEM_MOSAIC_NUM The ASTER GDEM data of the Tibetan Plateau have an accuracy of 30 meters, the raw data are in tif format, and the mosaic data are stored in the img format. The raw data of this data set were downloaded from the ASTERGDEM website and completely retained the original appearance of the data. ASTER GDEM was divided into several 1×1 degree data blocks during distribution. The distribution format was the zip compression format, and each compressed package included two files. The file naming format is as follows: ASTGTM_NxxEyyy_dem.tif ASTGTM_NxxEyyy_num.tif xx is the starting latitude, and yyy is the starting longitude. _dem.tif is the dem data file, and _num.tif is the data quality file. ASTER GDEM TILES: The original, unprocessed raw data are retained. ASTERGDEM_MOSAIC_DEM: Inlay the dem.tif data using Erdas software, and parameter settings use default values. ASRERGDEM_MOSAIC_NUM: Inlay the num.tif data using Erdas software, and parameter settings use default values. The original raw data are retained, and the accuracy is consistent with that of the ASTERGDEM data distribution website. The horizontal accuracy of the data is 30 meters, and the elevation accuracy is 20 meters. The mosaic data are made by Erdas, and the parameter settings use the default values.

0 2021-04-09

Remote sensing products of snow depth in Sanjiangyuan (1980-2018)

This dataset was derived from long-term daily snow depth in China based on the boundary of the three-river-source area. The snow depth ranges from 0 to 100 cm, and the temporal coverage is from January 1 1980 to December 31 2018. The spatial and temporal resolutions are 0.25o and daily, respectively. Snow depth was produced from satellite passive microwave remote sensing data which came from three different sensors that are SMMR, SSM/I and SSMI/S. Considering the systematic bias among these sensors, the inter-sensor calibrations were performed to obtain temporal consistent passive microwave remote sensing data. And the long-term daily snow depth in China were produced from this consistent data based on the spectral gradient method.For header file information, refer to the data set header.txt.

0 2021-03-28

Dataset of ZY-3 02 satellite images (2017)

The data set is remote sensing image of Resource 3 No. 02 (ZY3-02). ZY3-02 was successfully launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center at 11:17 on May 30, 2016 by Long March 4 B carrier rocket. China-made satellite imagery will be further strengthened in the areas of land surveying and mapping, resource survey and monitoring, disaster prevention and mitigation, agriculture, forestry and water conservancy, ecological environment, urban planning and construction, transportation and other fields. List of files: ZY302_PMS_E98.8_N37.4_201707_L1A0000156704 ZY302_PMS_E100.4_N37.0_20171127_L1A0000217243 ZY302_TMS_E99.5_N37.0_20170717_L1A0000160059 ZY302_TMS_E100.3_N36.6_20171127_L1A0000217279 ZY302_TMS_E100.4_N37.0_20170529_L1A0000139947 Folder Naming Rules: Satellite Name Sensor Name Central Longitude Central Latitude Acquisition Time L1****

0 2021-03-28

Dataset of ZY-3 satellite images (2017)

The major deserts in China include the Taklamakan Desert, Gurban Tunggut Desert, Qaidam Desert, Kumtag Desert, Badain Jaran Desert, Tengger Desert, Ulan Buh Desert, Hobq Desert, MU US Desert, Hunshandake Desert, Hulunbuir Sands, and Horqin Sands. All the desert boundaries were derived from Google Earth Pro® via manual interpretation. We delineated the desert boundaries using the Digital Global Feature Imagery and SpotImage (2011, 10 m resolution) collections of Google Earth Pro®, whose spatial resolution is finer than 30 m. The acquisition time of most images was in 2011.

0 2021-03-28

Dataset of GF-2 satellite images (2017)

Gf-2 satellite is the first civil optical remote sensing satellite independently developed by China with a spatial resolution better than 1 meter. It is equipped with two high-resolution 1-meter panchromatic and 4-meter multi-spectral cameras, and the spatial resolution of the sub-satellite can reach 0.8 meters. This data set is the remote sensing image data of 6 jing gaofen-2 satellite in 2017.The folder list is: GF2_PMS1_E100.5_N37.2_20171013_L1A0002678101 GF2_PMS1_E100.5_N37.4_20171013_L1A0002678097 GF2_PMS1_E100.6_N37.6_20171013_L1A0002678096 GF2_PMS2_E100.3_N37.4_20170810_L1A0002534662 File naming rules: satellite name _ sensor name _ center longitude _ center latitude _ imaging time _L****

0 2021-03-28

Dataset of GF-1 satellite images (2017-2018)

This data set is the remote sensing data of gaofan-1 satellite, including the data of two scenes of PMS1 camera on 2017-8-13 and 2017-10-5, one scene of PMS2 camera on 2017-5-27, and one scene of WFV2 and WFV3 camera on September 23, 2018.File list: GF1_PMS1_E99.1_N37.2_20170813_L1A0002539236 GF1_PMS1_E101.2_N36.4_20171005_L1A0002653985 GF1_PMS2_E100.3_N37.7_20170527_L1A0002384098 GF1_WFV2_E98.4_N37.6_20180927_L1A0003481737 GF1_WFV3_E100.4_N37.3_20180927_L1A0003481706

0 2021-03-28